When students understand how important that is, [...], Part 6 -  Feuillard #32 - Variations 4-7 Before working on the next few variations, I like to help refine the student's understanding of intonation. On the occasion of the partial eclipse of the Sun, January 13, 1907, which here reached a magnitude of nearly 0.6, we exercised more than usual care in the registration. Contents Arpeggios. 33 – Theme and Variations #1-3), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 11 – Feuillard No. 32 - Variations #12-17 We will continue this week with Feuillard No.32 Variations #12-17, which introduces the essential detaché stroke, sometimes colloquially called a "scrub" stroke. As I mentioned in that earlier discussion, dotted rhythms are notoriously difficult for string players. Each day, we are presented with innumerable challenges, from following the sobering news on TV and social media, being bombarded with worries, anxiety and panic about what is next to come in your country, your city, within yourself and for your loved ones. If the students can verbalize something they will understand it better, and it will be lodged deeper in their psyches. There are no short-cuts in learning these [...], Happy Holidays! Teaching Cello - Exercises for Beginning Cello Students. This may be because this student has a poor basic sound, is playing with too much tension, or doesn’t understand the mechanics of how the body works in playing the cello. We usually hear the word "arpeggios" right after "scales and . Detaché is perhaps our most important basic stroke, but it is difficult to execute well. Detaché means "detached" but the bow changes are connected in a somewhat legato fashion. The rule that was mentioned in an earlier blog is: "the shorter the string length, the lower the contact point". This week we will be working on two of the most difficult variations in No. I usually like to give the students at least a week to sort this all out, so that they can play the theme with more stable intonation, especially regarding [...], Part 5 -  Feuillard #32 - Theme and Variations 1-3 Now we are ready to start working on the Feuillard bowing exercises themselves. We also helped to organize the left hand in first position by checking the first and fourth fingers with the open strings, thus creating a clear "structure" for the left hand (for most people the tendency is for the first finger to be sharp and the fourth finger to be flat in first position). 32: Theme from Lesson 1: https://videopress.com/v/6vwb5UKn Then I explain to them how we check for [...], Part 4 -  Preliminaries: The Second Lesson Part 3  presented preliminary concepts which are necessary before starting the bowing exercises in Feuillard. 33 – Variations #10-20), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 13 – Feuillard No. There are several ways to work this out. 32. I created “Back to the Breath” Mindfulness and Visualization [...], Happy New Year! All rights reserved. Although rhythm is one of the most basic music elements, teachers often forget to stress [...], Part 12 -  Feuillard No. 33, which will again add to [...], Part 8 -  Feuillard No. Variation #4 and #5: Notice in the video that Iestyn knows the tempo of these variations when I asked him, because he has written in the tempos that he thinks are good as he works on them at home:   It is important for the students to be able to imagine their tempos before playing them in the lesson. 32, Variations #12-17), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 7 – Feuillard #32, Variations 8-11), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 6 – Feuillard #32, Variations #4-7), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 5 – Feuillard #32 – Theme and Variations 1-3), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 4 – Preliminaries: The Second Lesson), The Joy of Feuillard – A Sequential Approach to Teaching Bow Technique (Part 3 – Preliminaries: The First Lesson), Remembering George Neikrug (March 7, 1919 – March 9, 2019), Remembering Aldo Parisot (September 30, 1918 – December 29, 2018), A conversation with Elizabeth Rowe – principal flutist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Conversation with Karine Georgian (November, 2004), Interview with Eva Heinitz (December, 1997). Period: Romantic: Piece Style Romantic: Instrumentation Cello Different people use different terms, and the students should be familiar with all of them. No. Join ResearchGate to find the people and research you need to help your work.